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The Pursuit of Wisdom

(Proverbs 2:1-22)

Lesson 2 -- second quarter 2009
September 13, 2009

by Mark Roth
© Copyright 2009

Introductory questions to chew

Will I bring my choices into conformity to these verses?

How have I pursued wisdom this week?

What portion of wisdom did I succeed in seizing?

Do I want to be delivered from the way of evil men and strange women?

Why pursue wisdom...and how?

How frequently we wish for wisdom! Some times we experience this wish in advance: when we face exceptional challenges. Other times, though, we make our wish with all the glorious perception of hindsight: after we have made an atrocious mistake. Thus, today's lesson ought to really have our attention: Where and how to find godly wisdom. But first, why do you even want wisdom?

Some want it for right decision-making. They want the ability to handle the big challenges that require plenty of forethought as well as the quick decisions that grant little contemplative thought. This use of wisdom also enables proper responses, attitudes and advice. Few people enjoy making mistakes or being wrong -- they'd rather be wise!

Some want it for image enhancement and opportunity expansion. No doubt about it: People think highly of those who just seem to have the knack for saying and doing the right thing at the right time. Those are the people who get the breaks, who get followed.

Well, enough of that exercise! Of course there are many ignoble reasons for wanting wisdom; there also are many noble ones. In summary of this portion, God's wisdom is only for the glory of God and the good of others. God's wisdom is given exclusively to those who desire to be "pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be intreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy" (James 3:17). Do I qualify?

So, having pure motives for wanting wisdom, how shall we find it?

Have pure motives!

That's it! I know it seems repetitious but that's how God's blessed cycles are. Wisdom is given to those with pure hearts. Wisdom seeks those committed to it. Imagine something so good pursuing you, hunting for you!

Seek it.

"Oh sure!" you say. "I can look and look and not find it!" Then you must answer some questions. Where are you seeking it? Are you seeking it first or are there higher priorities? Are you always alert for it? How much are you willing to pay for it? Do you look for it regularly? Is this the prayer of your heart? My friend, the pursuit of wisdom cannot be half-hearted if it is to be successful!

Don't get distracted.

This morning I began the day as usual: seeking the Wise One and His wisdom. And this morning, as usual, I got distracted: Figuring out how to market my business more effectively. We've got to remember that the path to wisdom and the path of wisdom both have countless side trails, sideshows and sidetrackers. So stay focused! Many of these distractions will not only take our attention away from our pursuit, they will also take us places where wisdom cannot be found. Reject wrong or inappropriate distractions. The legitimate ones should be shelved or made the launching point for the pursuit of practical wisdom.

Live it.

Do, say and think the wisdom you already have. Wisdom lived expands your receptability of and capacity for further wisdom. Wisdom reproduces after its kind. Sow wisdom and you'll reap more wisdom. Another aspect of this truth involves the company you keep: You've got to walk with the wise! And this isn't limited to flesh-and-blood companions. This also encompasses your paper-and-ink companions and your electrons-and-technology companions.


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